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Pupil Premium

‘High profile, high expectations, no excuses’


Pupil Premium: the facts

Introduced in April 2011, the pupil premium is allocated to children who are looked after by the local authority, and those who have been eligible for Free School Meals (FSM) at any point in the last six years (also known as Ever 6).

Since April 2014 children who are looked after, or who have been adopted from care, have received a higher rate of funding than children from low-income families - the ‘Pupil Premium Plus’. This is to reflect the unique challenges they face at school where they often struggle to keep up with their peers at both primary and secondary level.

Children who have parents in the armed forces are also supported through the service child premium.

Why have Pupil Premium funding? 

Statement from the Department for Education (December 2013)

Attainment gaps between pupils from deprived backgrounds and their more affluent peers persist through all stages of education, including entry into higher education.  The highest early achievers from deprived backgrounds are overtaken by lower achieving children from advantaged backgrounds by age seven.  The gap widens further during secondary education and persists into higher education.  The likelihood of a pupil eligible for FSM achieving five or more GCSEs at A*-C including English and mathematics is less than one third of a non-FSM pupil.  A pupil from a non-deprived background is more than twice as likely to go on to study at university as their deprived peer.

 

For 2016-17, Pupil Premium money is used for children who: 

  1. Are currently in receipt of Free School Meals (FSM) - (£935)
  2. Have been in receipt of FSM at any time in the last 6 years (Ever 6) - (£935)
  3. Have been in care / looked after (for 1 day or longer) - (£1900)
  4. Have been adopted from care on or after 30th December 2005, or left care under a special guardianship order or a residence order - (£1900)
  5. Have parents in the armed forces - (£300)

Pupil Premium Funding 

There is a discrepancy between funding we receive from the Department for Education and the money we spend on our Pupil Premium students. This is due to two factors: 1) the Local Authority holds the funds for all Looked After students. While the full funding is spent on each Looked After child, it is controlled by the LA rather than the school; 2) While the school continuously updates our Pupil Premium list, the Department for Education’s official list is only updated annually. Each calendar year several Year 11 students officially cease to qualify for the Pupil Premium (having had more than 6 years since they were last entitled to Free School Meals). In this situation, where a student has been entitled to Pupil Premium funding for the majority of their time here, the school continues to provide their Pupil Premium entitlements until the end of Year 11. 

Financial Year Amount of Pupil Premium Funding
2014-15 £168,395
2015-16 £162,175
2016-17 £158,495

 

Academic Year: 2014-15 2015-16 2016-17
% Pupil Premium Students 18.1% 17.8% 16.5%

 

Academic Year

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

  No.of students Funding per student Total No. of students Funding per student Total No. of students Funding per student Total

Number of FSM/Ever6 students eligible for the Pupil Premium

175

£935

£163,625

165

£935

£154,275

157

£935

£146,765

Number of Looked After students eligible for the Pupil Premium

2

£1,900

£3,800

1

£1,900

£1,900

2

£1,900

£3.800

Adopted from Care

4

£1,900

£7,600

4

£1,900

£7,600

6

£1,900

£11,400

Number of service children eligible for the Pupil Premium

1

£300

£300

1

£300

£300

1

£300

£300

Total

181

 

£175,325

170

 

£164,075

165

 

£162,295

 


Strategy for raising the achievement of disadvantaged students

Principles 

  • Raising the achievement of disadvantaged students is the responsibility of every member of staff at Furze Platt Senior School
  • The needs of every disadvantaged student deserve to be understood so that they can be addressed
  • We will take positive action to remove identified barriers to learning and address disadvantage
  • Disadvantaged students need to make accelerated and sustained progress to close the gaps

Aims of the strategy 

To close the gap in achievement between disadvantaged and non-disadvantaged students by:

  • Understanding the needs/barriers of our disadvantaged students and acting to address them
  • Providing high quality teaching which is closely tailored to their needs
  • Ensuring excellent attainment and progress in the essential subjects of English and Maths
  • Using data effectively to ensure every disadvantaged student makes at least good progress, and where they are behind they to make rapid progress to catch up
  • Listening to the student voice and ensuring their views are heard and acted upon and they have a real stake in the school
  • By explicitly holding teachers, middle leaders and SLT to account for the attainment and progress of disadvantaged students
  • Providing effective intervention where specific gaps in attainment and achievement need more support to be closed
  • Providing high quality support for the broader skills and personal qualities students require to succeed – resilience, independence, self-belief
  • Planning a rich, personalised curriculum
  • Ensuring equality of opportunity in accessing the extended curriculum and extra-curricular activities
  • Providing support for emotional and behavioural difficulties
  • Engaging positively with parents/carers and providing high quality parental support
  • Securing excellent attendance
  • Providing effective CEIAG to ensure students develop clear, aspirational goals for life beyond school

 


Key Responsibilities

Governors 

  1. All governors: hold senior leaders to account through the scrutiny of regular reports regarding the attainment and progress of disadvantaged provided by the senior team and Pupil Premium governor.
  2. Pupil Premium Governor: takes a particular interest in the attainment, progress and broader support for disadvantaged students, on behalf of the governing body.  The PP governor will meet regularly with the Raising Standards Leader /Pupil Premium Champion to monitor the strategy and evaluate its effectiveness. 

Senior Leaders 

  1. Headteacher: takes overarching responsibility for the strategy and holds senior leaders to account.  They will work closely with the RSL/Pupil Premium Champion to track progress, challenge any underachievement, celebrate success and evaluate the effectiveness of the strategy.
  2. Raising Standards Leader/Pupil Premium Champion: forensically tracks the attainment and progress of all disadvantaged students, challenges all leaders and holds them to account where students are not making rapid progress.  The RSL/PP Champion will also ensure this cohort is at the forefront of all actions and initiatives implemented by the school.  They will monitor the spending of the Pupil Premium funding, ensure a clear audit trail and that case studies are developed to evidence the progress made by students. They will provide regular reports to governors regarding the progress of these students.
  3. Deputy Headteacher – teaching and learning: ensures teaching meets the needs of all groups of students and secures rapid progress for disadvantaged students.  They will ensure ongoing high quality training on how to teach and support disadvantaged students based on school, local and national best practice. Where teaching does not meet the needs of these students, clear targets will be set and training and coaching provided.
  4. Deputy Headteacher – curriculum: ensures the curriculum is broad, balanced and enriching and can be fully accessed by disadvantaged students.  Where appropriate the curriculum will be personalised to maximise the benefit to students and to ensure they are successful.  They will also ensure effective early support for CEIAG so that students have aspirational goals and understand how to achieve them.
  5. Assistant Headteacher: Student Support: ensures the personal development and wellbeing of disadvantaged students.   This will include ensuring effective transition from primary school and support for learning and the promotion of positive behaviours (e.g. developing resilience and aspiration) through the house system and the pastoral team and high expectations of attendance.  The AHT Student Support will work with a number of key members of staff (Heads of House, pastoral managers, attendance officer, school counsellor, family support worker) and a number of outside agencies to ensure disadvantaged students receive the support they need (EWO, social care, intensive Family Support, Drugs and Alcohol team (DAAT))
  6. Assistant Headteacher – Head of Sixth Form: works closely with the RSL/PP Champion to ensure that disadvantaged students are supported to meet or exceed their targets and that they have access to high quality advice/experience of HE.   The Student Support Manager will liaise with teachers, parents and school and external agencies to ensure they receive high quality support.

Middle Leaders 

Curriculum Leaders: forensically track the attainment and progress of all disadvantaged students in their curriculum area, challenging all teachers and holding them to account where students are not making rapid progress.  They will also ensure this cohort prioritised for any initiatives introduced by the department and seek additional resources for disadvantaged students if required.   They will provide regular reports to the Raising Standards Leader/Pupil Premium Champion regarding the progress of these students.

Heads of House: forensically track the attainment and progress of all disadvantaged students in their house, intervening where patterns of underachievement/low resilience/ lack of organisation/ lack of motivation/ poor behaviour /complex and challenging home circumstances are barriers to making rapid progress.  Those with responsibility for transition (KS2 -3, KS3 -4 and KS4 -5) will ensure that all disadvantaged students receive targeted support and advice.

Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator: ensures students with SEN who are also disadvantaged (therefore doubly disadvantaged) are effectively supported by the Learning Support team, therefore making good/rapid progress. They will also ensure that progress is forensically tracked and that interventions are adjusted/changed if there is insufficient evidence of good progress. Learning Support Assistants will know who disadvantaged students are in the classes/withdrawal groups that they support and will be proactive in removing barriers to learning and providing additional support.

Teachers 

Teachers: set high expectations of all disadvantaged students and ensure that teaching is high quality and carefully planned to meet the needs of disadvantaged students, enabling them to make accelerated and sustained progress.  They will use assessment information to identify learning gaps or where further challenge is required and refine their teaching accordingly. They will remove any barriers to learning (e.g. lack of basic equipment, access to resources) and seek additional resources (via their curriculum leader) if required.

 


Pupil Premium Expenditure 2015 -16

The money provided to the school for the support of disadvantaged students was spent in the following ways:

Additional staffing hours in English & mathematics to support small group
and 1:1 intervention work

(Specialist intervention workers and extra teaching hours)

Time split between Catch Up Premium and Pupil Premium

£ 31,000

 

Learning Mentors

(Team of 3, providing targeted academic support and intervention to disadvantaged students)

£ 65,500

 

Counselling Services

This funding has enabled us to support some of our most vulnerable students with specialist counselling

£ 12,000

 

Parent Support Worker

Supporting parents to support their children (parenting advice and training, practical and financial advice and support, supporting meetings about understanding their child’s progress and how to support them)

£5,000

Extended Curriculum Activities

  • Additional study support sessions/revision sessions
  • Subsidies for trips and visits
  • Subsidies for music tuition

£ 9,000

 

Alternative Curriculum team activity

  • One to one raising achievement sessions
  • Social skills provision
  • Personalised provision on or off site
  • Study Hall staffing

£ 15,000

 

ICT software & equipment

  • Purchase of laptops to loan to disadvantaged students without access to ICT equipment at home
  • Purchase of site licences that enable improved tracking, monitoring and support of disadvantaged students

£7,500

Departmental resources & training

Resources to support wider study, home learning, practical activities, specialist equipment

£3,000

 

Staff training and development

  • Training for LSAs
  • Training/coaching for teachers
  • Keeping abreast of best practice
  • External review of Pupil Premium provision

£6,000

Contingency

  • School equipment/ICT resources/ tutoring not met by above etc
  • Emergency support for students – provision of uniform, stationery etc
  • Additional staffing to cover pre / after school academic support sessions

£6,500

Impact 

Part 1: Key Stage 4 2015-16

In 2016 there were 36 students in receipt of Pupil Premium in Year 11, 19.4% of the cohort (above the school average of 17.8%). There were 24 Pupil Premium students in Year 10. (At only 12.8% of the year group, this is our smallest Pupil Premium cohort).

A range of strategies and interventions have contributed to the attainment and progress of disadvantaged students – from quality teaching in the classroom to the support of the mentor teams. Added to that, the work of the Parent Support Worker, Counsellor and CEIAG teams have helped guide and support disadvantaged students throughout their time at Furze Platt.

Learning Mentors have supported students with study and revision skills, time management and organisation and subject-specific tuition and support.

Attainment 

100% of students in receipt of Pupil Premium achieved at least one GCSE.

In 2016, the Pupil Premium cohort had a KS2 APS of 26.4. 50% of the cohort achieved the ‘Basics’ (A*-C in both English and mathematics). The 2015 cohort, with a KS2 APS of 27.2, saw 54% achieve the ‘Basics’. In both cases, this is a significant rise on the 2014 figure of 23%. As with the ‘Basics’, 2016 also sees Pupil Premium students continue their 3 year upward trend in the proportion achieving 5A*-C grades including English & mathematics, with 44% passing this threshold. This is a rise from 42% in 2015 and 23% in 2014.

The ‘Basics’ attainment gap between Pupil Premium and other students was 29%, against a (2015) national average gap of 27%. The gap has closed significantly from 48% in 2014. The 2016 figure of 50% of Pupil Premium students is 12% higher than the 2015 national figure of 38% for disadvantaged students. The focus remains to continue closing the gap to ‘other’ students nationally – currently 15%.

Average KS2 attainment is 26.4 (4B) for Pupil Premium students and 28.6 (4A) for other students.

Progress 

English: 69% of Pupil Premium students made Expected Progress in English, 12% higher than the (2015) national average of 57% for disadvantaged students. The progress gap of 20% represents a significant closure from 2014, falling from 38%. The proportion of disadvantaged students making More than Expected Progress has more than tripled over three years from 12% in 2014 to 39% in 2016. Comparing progress of disadvantaged students at Furze Platt to the national figure for other students, our students are 5% behind (an equivalent of two students) for Expected Progress. However, more able disadvantaged students are 21% ahead of national other students for this measure. For those making Better than Expected Progress, low ability disadvantaged students are 3% (1 student) behind other students nationally – while middle and upper ability disadvantaged students are making better progress than other students nationally.

Maths: 57% of Pupil Premium students made Expected Progress in Maths, 8% higher than the (2015) national average of 49% for disadvantaged students. The progress gap of 25% represents a significant closure from 2014, falling from 40%. The proportion of disadvantaged students making More than Expected Progress more than doubled from 9% in 2014 to 26% in 2016.Comparing progress of disadvantaged students at Furze Platt to the national figure for other students, our students are 15% behind (an equivalent of six students) for Expected Progress. For those making Better than Expected Progress, disadvantaged students are 9% (3 students) behind other students nationally – while upper ability disadvantaged students are making better progress than other students nationally.

CEIAG at Key Stage 4 is part funded by the Pupil Premium. Destinations information is formally maintained by the Royal Borough of Windsor & Maidenhead. However, the school also keeps its own record of where our students go to study after their GCSEs. Of the 2016 Year 11 Pupil Premium cohort, 33% have remained at Furze Platt and have joined our 6th Form. 1 student has relocated to another part of the country and joined a 6th Form there. We do not have data for two students, while all other have enrolled at local colleges (Henley, Reading, East Berkshire, BCA) on Level 3 or 2 vocational courses.

 

Furze Platt Sixth Form

Other School

College

Apprenticeship

Not known

Pupil Premium

11 (32%)

1 (3%

21 (62%)

0 (0%)

1 (3%)

Non Pupil Premium

108 (68%)

3 (2%)

38 (24%)

4 (3%)

4 (3%)

Overall

119 (62%)

4 (2%)

59 (31%)

4 (2%)

5 (3%)

Part 2: Key Stage 3 2015-16 

In 2016 there were 43 students (21.8% of the year group) in receipt of Pupil Premium, compared to 38 (19.3%) in Year 8 and 33 (17.1%) in Year 7.

Across Key Stage 3, quality teaching remains at the core of our offer for disadvantaged students. Alongside this, the English and Maths intervention mentors provide in class support, working with small groups or 1:1. Many disadvantaged students also participate in the Reading and Phonics programme – helping to accelerate their reading age, while others also benefit from the Paired Maths programme. Vulnerable students are supported by our Learning Mentor team, who provide a range of offers from organisation and study skills through to subject-specific support.

Across all their subjects, disadvantaged students in Year 9 made better progress than other students. For example, 42% of disadvantaged students made more than 5 Sub Levels of Progress across 9 subjects, compared to 30% of other students. In English, disadvantaged students made an average of 4.1 Sub Levels of Progress compared to 3.9 for other students. Notably, the proportion of disadvantaged students who made 2 full Levels of Progress was 8% than other students. Proportions making 2 full Levels of Progress is identical in Maths.

 

Support Across Key Stage 3 & 4 

Our Parental Support Worker has worked with 26 families in the year 2015-2016. This wide ranging work has included offering teen parenting courses through to helping families get financial support. The vast bulk of their work has been with our disadvantaged students, with some priority foci: 100% attendance of PP at parents evening (or some kind of parental appointment); To support parents to ensure students’ attendance improves; To support parents to ensure students’ behaviour improve; To offer support to families when they are in crisis, this is a key support offer for families where there are safeguarding concerns in a Local Authority that struggles to meet the needs of vulnerable families. 

Outcomes

Throughout the course of the year 2015-16 we managed to see all PP parents in one way or another. PP attendance at parents evening in 2014-2015 was 67%. PP attendance at parents evening 2015-16 was 88%. All PP parents who did not attend were followed up and met at any destination (including the local coffee shop) by Heads of House with feedback from teachers. This has improved engagement from some of our hard to read parents so we hope this will build their confidence with school. We expect attendance at parents evening to rise further.

The worst attenders PP (<85%) was reduced down to 3.0%, which almost matched the school total of 2.9% for 2015 and comfortably beating the 2015 national average for all students (5.6%). Our team’s next job of work is to work on students with above 85% attendance but below 90%.

All of the families our PSW offered support to were at one time or another in crisis. The PSW offered vital coordination between Social Services, Early Help providers and the school.

KS3-4 Attendance:  The attendance of students in receipt of Pupil Premium improved from 91% in 2012-13 to 94.1% in 2014-15, there was a small drop to 93.9% in 2015-2016. The number of poor Pupil Premium attenders (<85%) in 2015-16 was reduced to 3.0% (6 students), which was close to the whole school total of 2.9% for 2015 and comfortably beating the 2015 national average for all students (5.6%). A core focus for 2016-17 is to work with students whose attendance is above 85% but below 90%. The gap between the attendance of Pupil Premium students and the whole cohort has reduced from 4% to 2.3%.

 


Key Actions 2016 -17

To further understand the needs of our disadvantaged students we undertook a detailed survey (July 2015). The outcomes of this survey have been built into our strategy. 

1. Ensuring quality first teaching 

Lead: Deputy Headteacher – Teaching and Learning

Key actions will be to:

  • Develop structured opportunities for acting on feedback: reflection and improvement time
  • Develop meta cognition and peer to peer support (EEF Foundation research)
  • Remove any barriers to being ready to learn (e.g. ensure access to equipment and resources)
  • Further develop stretch and challenge in all lessons
  • Provide additional personalised training/coaching for teachers who need to improve aspects of practice

2. Tracking and monitoring progress 

Lead: Assistant Headteacher – Raising Standards Leader

Key actions will be:

  • Strengthened accountabilities through a clear cycle of RSL meetings and reports to SLT and Governors reporting on progress
  • Continued rollout of a new data management system (Go4Schools) which will provide ‘live data’ enabling more rapid response
  • Increased data collection points leading to closer monitoring of progress and the ability to intervene
  • The development of regular clear and concise reports which enable key stakeholders (teachers, middle leaders, SLT, governors) to know the current position, and act quickly on next steps

3. Interventions 

Lead: Assistant Headteacher – Raising Standards Leader

The following teams/colleagues will provide targeted interventions:

  • Learning Support – for Year 7 Catch Up Premium students and disadvantaged students whose literacy levels are low on entry or continue to require support to access the curriculum.
  • English Intervention – rapid catch up for students Year 7 -11 who need intervention to close gaps in learning and to make good/rapid progress in English (including Year 7 Catch Up Premium)
  • Maths Intervention -  rapid catch up for students Year 7 -11 who need intervention to close gaps in learning and to make good/rapid progress in Maths (including Year 7 Catch Up Premium)
  • Raising Achievement Team: Learning Mentors – targeted subject support with subjects where students have gaps or are falling behind; provision of study skills, revision skills, mentoring

4. Building Learning Capacity 

Lead: Assistant Headteacher: Student Support

Key actions will be:

  • Setting high expectations, and providing high levels of support for students transitioning to Year 7
  • Providing high quality, structured support for home learning after school
  • Providing a dedicated Key Stage 3 mentor for students with emotional/behavioural difficulties (DA)
  • Guaranteeing parents/carers a meeting to discuss their child’s progress if they are unable to attend parents’ evening.
  • Developing work on growth mindsets and building resilience
  • Further increasing the emphasis on excellent attendance and punctuality

5. Curriculum 

Lead: Deputy Headteacher – curriculum

Key actions will be:

  • Personalising the curriculum for a small number of Year 11 students in order to maximise achievement
  • Ensuring support for the very able through the gifted and talented programme
  • Ensuring access to university visits (including Oxbridge) for disadvantaged students
  • Increasing capacity to offer more vocational qualifications ‘in house’

 


Provisional Pupil Premium Planned Expenditure 2016 -17

The money provided to the school for the support of disadvantaged students will be spent in the following ways:

Additional staffing hours in English & mathematics to support small group
and 1:1 intervention work

(Specialist intervention workers and extra teaching hours)

£ 32,100

 

Learning Mentors

(Team of 3, providing targeted academic support and intervention to disadvantaged students)

£ 66,300

Counselling Services

This funding has enabled us to support some of our most vulnerable students with specialist counselling

£ 11,000

Parent Support Worker

Supporting parents to support their children (parenting advice and training, practical and financial advice and support, supporting meetings about understanding their child’s progress and how to support them)

£5,500

Extended Curriculum Activities

  • Additional study support sessions/revision sessions
  • Subsidies for trips and visits
  • Subsidies for music tuition

£ 10,000

 

Alternative Curriculum team activity

  • One to one raising achievement sessions
  • Social skills provision
  • Personalised provision on or off site
  • Study Hall staffing

£ 15,000

ICT software & equipment

  • Purchase of laptops to loan to disadvantaged students without access to ICT equipment at home
  • Purchase of site licences that enable improved tracking, monitoring and support of disadvantaged students

£5,000

Departmental resources & training

Resources to support wider study, home learning, practical activities, specialist equipment – increased total for 2016-17 to cover the rollout of resources for new exam specifications

£5,000

 

Staff training and development

  • Training for LSAs
  • Training/coaching for teachers
  • Keeping abreast of best practice

£4,000

Contingency

  • School equipment/ICT resources/ tutoring not met by above etc
  • Emergency support for students – provision of uniform, stationery etc
  • Additional staffing to cover pre / after school academic support sessions

£4,600

Total

£158,500